Tag Archives: tips

More Writing Tips From Someone Who Doesn’t Know What They’re Doing

writing2

(An unintended continuation of this post.)

The Emmys are tonight, which is super exciting and everything. This is an obvious opportunity to celebrate another year of brilliant television. There have been some amazing productions this year on both network, cable, and streaming services. The game is being changed, and it has been amazing to observe, to the point where reception has been, at times, delightfully overwhelming. This must be praised, as quality programming, like other forms of artistic expression, needs to be recognized, talked about, and experienced — because when it is, even more stories get told (especially those that probably wouldn’t have otherwise).

However, yet another year has gone by where I don’t feel like I even have an idea to flesh out. (Yes, I’m making this about me.)

One day I’d love to write something worthy of recognition on such a level. But to do that, I’m going to have to keep writing.

I’ve lived in Los Angeles my whole life, so the star-studded aspect isn’t novel to me. What is novel, however, is seeing people you know do things that you could only dream of doing. In knowing these people, I know first hand that they have the same 24 hours in one day as anyone else. They’ve periods of discouragement and laziness, like everyone else. But they keep moving.

This weekend I was able to go through some old stories and poems from college. Not to toot my own horn, but I wrote pretty damn well. But I was a bit stubborn and, due to writing more for the grade rather than the passion, present-day me could really sense the loss of drive and focus within each piece. It’s no wonder why I refused to read or write during the year following graduation.

The drive has definitely come back, though, almost to the point when I first started writing as a young teenager. I remember writing so much then, even performed at open mics and submitted my work to publications. I wasn’t afraid of saying or doing something. I wanted to contribute, and truly felt my work to hold as much weight as others’.

I’m not sure if that’s exactly the case for me now. If anything, I’m much more conscious about what I put out there, probably due to the saturation of ideas on social media, and how quickly information can be dispensed, digested, and transferred. The pressure to make an impact is very much there, as is the desire.

Like anything else, the view just needs to be scaled back a bit.  I need to go back in my personal history and touch on what’s been pushed out of memory. I need to ask myself difficult questions, especially in relation with others, and experience the breeze every once in a while. I need to write what I know, and be endlessly curious about what I don’t.

And, I need to keep writing.

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How Do I…? Mental Feng Shui 

Whenever I hear about feng shui, it’s referenced as being an arrangement of objects to where the placement holds the possibility to either foster or hinder energy. It’s this energy that we need to attain a desired outlook, perception, and foundation for oneself.  (This article via Real Simple explains it really well.)

Now, I’m not an expert, but if there is one thing I know it’s that it is about far more than furniture. If, at its core, it is about what keeps things in the direction in which we are going, then I’d like to apply the concept to the space where we spend all of our time — our minds.

Below are five potential ideas on how to do so:

1. Daydream for a minute. Literally, for 60 seconds (or 30, if you’re really pressed for time). The brief shift in focus may be all that’s needed to get to the next moment with a little less stress at the helm.

2. Change your smartphone’s wallpaper or theme. It’s a little like getting a new sheet set, to be honest. As a Samsung user, I’ve found plenty of free themes in the Samsung Themes section of Settings (and I’m fairly certain the iPhone has plenty of options available as well). My two favorites are Ece and Aurora_curiosoo, shown below:

Ece Samsung theme

Aurora_curiosoo Samsung theme

3. Update your LinkedIn profile. LinkedIn has quickly become the social media equivalent of one’s resume, without the formal pressure of a cover letter and stiffly-worded salutation. Even if you aren’t looking for a new employment opportunity, it’s a good way to remind yourself of your strengths and abilities especially if you happen to feel stagnant for one reason or another. Plus, the news feed and following capabilities make it a great space to build and maintain a professional network. Not everyone can make it to meetups or mixers,  but you can definitely log in to LinkedIn.

4. Do something different. Anything. Use a different pen to note tasks. Walk a different route during your afternoon break. Eat your salad with a different salad dressing. Listen to a band, artist, or podcaster that sounds like or covers similar topics to whoever you currently listen to. It is the quickest way to do something out of the box yet remain close to any previously designated boundaries of comfort. And on that note…

5. Keep your ear to the ground entertainment-wise. There are numerous options to stay in the now with TV, films, music, and books. I’ve had Netflix and HBO Go for ages and recently subscribed to Amazon Music. Personally, I enjoy the relative non-commitment of listening to numerous albums before buying them, But also, there’s something about commercial-free streaming that keeps the vibes at a cool, even keel.

This is merely my personal take at present — please feel free to leave any tips in the comments on how you funnel energy and iron out the kinks.

ttfn~

Lead photo via Benicia Herald

20 Blog Posts on Rose-Colored Linds! What I’ve Learned So Far

blog2I am, at my core, a writer. Since I was a child, it has always come relatively easily, what with having a very vivid imagination and the ability to be infatuated with just about anyone (or anything). But like most creative endeavors, full-time adulting eventually took the fun out of it.

It’s been that way for about six years — that is, until the idea for Rose-Colored Linds came about. I truly don’t know what changed, but writing and documenting here for the past month-and-a-half has been really fun. Needless to say, I am looking forward to more.

To mark this milestone of 20 posts, I thought it fitting to share what I’ve learned so far:

1. The best ideas really do come in the shower, or while driving, or out for a walk. I’ve been making a concerted habit to go through my thoughts during such moments of pause. Sometimes it gets a just a little bit weird, but, hey, we’re all mad here, etc.

2. Research is more than a Google search. Listening to new music, going through your Twitter news feed, engaging in water cooler talk — that’s research, too. Writing is inherently a solo activity, but it instantly becomes a social engagement once published. So being somewhat in tune what’s stimulating others will assist in what you add to the discourse.

3. If you want to create content, don’t wait — start now. As in right now. If you think it’s all been done, think again. Sure, there’s a lot of content out there, but there’s always room for more, especially if it comes from a fresh perspective. The interwebs are deep and dark, but plenty of gems kick up to the surface. Let one of them be yours.

4. Visuals go a long way. Everyone has an imagination, but there’s something to be said for a photo or video making a wall of text more digestible. If a picture is worth a thousand words, you’ll probably only have to write 500 or so.

5. Be patient. Stick with your dream. Earlier this year, I had big plans for the patio garden outside my apartment — a hopeful little jungle oasis to be enjoyed during the heat of summer. I bought some seedlings, was gifted a couple tomato plants, and my faithful annual geranium started blooming. It took a while, and didn’t turn out exactly as I’d imagined, but I’ve got a garden that I’m really proud of. Things don’t happen overnight. They may not happen for weeks, or months, or even longer than that — but they will.

To wrap it up, I’ll leave you with this quote by inspirational speaker Sandra Turley: “Seek to be worth knowing rather than well known.”

Thanks for reading – see you in the next post!